If You’re Raising a Girl, You Need This New eCourse!

My daughter was almost 11 when this course started to materialize in my mind. It happened because hundreds of other moms in the Fit2B Forum kept getting angry:

“All I got was sex-ed in high school, but by then I’d used tampons wrong and had horrible posture! Why can’t anyone teach about those things? Beth, can you write something for our girls?? I don’t even know where to begin…”

That’s right, comment after comment in thread after thread expressing the anger of women around the world because they weren’t told as little girls about what they’re learning about their bodies on Fit2B.

They were angry because if they had known about certain things  and avoided all of the poorly-informed decisions they’d casually made all their life without realizing how it would all add up to their bodies — it would have potentially saved them YEARS of body confusion, fear, slow birth recovery, terrible cramps, painful intercourse, and more.

But what makes our new Fit2B Girls eCourse truly unique is that we covered each of those topics without making it about sexual reproduction, contraception, or boys.

This course is purely about girls understanding their bodies, taking care of themselves, and being confident in their ability to do great things in this world for good!

It was a challenge, but with the help of amazing contributors and our huge forum of members from around the world, we came up with encouraging language and definitions that met everyone’s standards of basic, non-religious, non-sexual education.

It’s that simple. You’ll be amazed!

And if you’re not?

If you buy it, preview it, and hate it, we’ll refund you. No biggie.

We seriously doubt that will be the case, though, because our beta launch review team of 20 critical bloggers {who sent me pages and pages of edits that I painstakingly and personally collated and integrated} from all walks of life and all demographics was over the moon about it. We’re pretty sure you will love it. More importantly your girl will be positively impacted by its videos, written content and printables.

You can check out the real, never-edited reviews people have shared with us about this course here

This Course is About Empowering Your Girl to Respect Her Body & Keep it Healthy

Already being hailed by homeschoolers as an excellent resource for health and physical education — and with 3 homeschooling families on staff at Fit2B, mine currently included — it was important to us to provide hands-on learning tools that will really help girls connect with the information in fun ways.

Some homeschool families are using this for a science unit, doing one lesson per week.

Some single dads are using this for their girls who have suddenly started their period because they trust us to talk to their girls about all this without making it about sex and boys.

Some grandparents who have grandchildren in their home are also excited to use it.

It’s even deepened our relationships with our own daughters – there are 7 total among the Fit2B families, ages 6-16 right now – as we have had them take everything for a test run, try the printables, watch the videos…The conversations that all of this starts are the best!

Each lesson covers a different topic such as…Fit2B Girls eCourse - Fit2B

  • Nutrition
  • Alignment
  • Fitness
  • Periods
  • Charting
  • Female Anatomy
  • Finding Your Fashion
  • Healthy Beauty Tips
  • Breast Self-Exams
  • Bladder & Bowel Health
  • The First Pelvic Exam (usually not needed until after age 20, but it’s important to know what to watch for and be prepared for circumstances that would require one to happen sooner)
  • Plus TONS of printables and downloads!

Guide Notes from Beth

As a parent, it was important for me to speak straight to you, the person taking a girl through all the lessons. So at the start of the course, before each lesson, and at the end of the course, you’ll see notes for you, the guide. 

Because I get it.

We’re talking about delicate subject matter. I respect and honor that you need to trust what we’re teaching your girl, understand the heart behind each lesson, comprehend each contributor’s place in the course, and feel firm on how you guide your girl through all the info.

So while 95% of the content is written to young girls, getting right down — but not talking down — to their level, each lesson has a “Guide Note From Beth” that you can open, read, and then close prior to having your girl access the lesson’s content. The course also has several videos for you, the guide. 

Plus, the more sensitive anatomy content is also set up as an accordion menu, so you can pick and choose which parts you want your girl to learn about first. That’s right, you determine the order.

You decide the pace and order of the content for your girl

You know how some digital content online forces you to go through it at a set pace or in a certain order? We didn’t do that in this course. You don’t have to do lesson one before you do lesson two. As the trusted adult guiding your girl through the course, you can take your time previewing it, and then YOU determine the order of the lessons.

At the moment this course is launching, my girl is now 12, and she helped me film the period products unit where you’ll see us showing ALL the options available to girls. You’ll see us utilizing a plastic model of the pelvic bones and muscles to show how each fits inside or outside a girl’s body and discussing hygiene and safe usage of each product, so you and your girl can make objective decisions about what may serve her well now and later in her other life stages. 

My daughter gave me permission to share that she hasn’t yet started her period, so – like many of you buying the course – I’m holding off on a few of the lessons. She’s not yet ready to absorb the information in the lessons about natural relief for period pain, charting her cycle, or her first visit to the gynecologist (well, she saw a few snippets of it while I was editing it).

I don’t want to give her information overload, and I want to spread things out and watch for the right moment to give her what she needs. The lessons aren’t going anywhere, but she sure is! Like your girl, mine has a bright future!

 

Some girls start their periods as early as eight years old. I have a niece who didn’t start until she was 17, and that’s not uncommon. So while we say this course is for 9-14-year-old girls, that parameter isn’t set in stone. I learned things myself while compiling all the lessons, and so did the contributors who are now going through it. The content is that cutting-edge and fresh!

We even have some parents who’ve informed us that they plan to take their boys through it along with their girls because they love how we provided empowering information that teaches respect.

This course can be used so many different ways

It can be done all at once in a special weekend. It can be done as part of a science study over a semester. It can be done in pieces as your girl needs each lesson. A few lessons can be done now, and a few more next year, and a few more the year after that.

Once you enroll, you have forever access, so take your time. Let your girl take her time. Go her pace and space it out to meet her needs.

Get this course today. It will educate your girl. It might even teach you a few eye-opening things about your own body that give you a reason to rejoice in how your own body works!

What are you waiting for? Click here to learn more and enroll

 

10 thoughts on “If You’re Raising a Girl, You Need This New eCourse!

  1. Sandra McGrandle says:

    Quick question…and this may be answered in the lessons 🙂 but when are you suggesting is appropriate for a girl to have her first gyn visit? I can’t see taking my 12 (almost 13) year old although she started her cycle in January of this year. She would likely be embarrassed at best and probably horrified at the prospect. Also she would want me with her (and I would want to be) but in California they get weird about having parents in the room once a child turns 12. Our female pediatrician is cool about it but we’ve known her since Rachel was born. IDK what my gyn would be like (she is a woman but I don’t see her often so we aren’t very close). Anyway – just wanted to ask because I haven’t even considered having her go to a gyn yet. Am I wrong? She is still so young, honestly, and kind of sheltered (in a good way). We have always talked about things frankly (despite her current embarrassment at times, which came on when she was about 11) so I hope your lessons will pave the way for better conversations. Thanks!!

    • Beth Learn
      Beth Learn says:

      Excellent question. The certified nurse midwife who covers that particular piece of content does a fantastic job of clarifying when an exam is needed and when it’s not. Typically, they don’t need to happen until a girl is in her early 20’s but exceptions happen. A huge part of this course is highlighting things girls should watch for in their bodies, so then they know who to talk to and what to expect. Should your daughter notice a strange lump while caring for herself during her period, she’d want to have that examined by a quality professional, and that lesson covers what to look for in a good one, what her rights are as patient, and so much more. The perspective is that less is more EXCEPT when something is amiss, and then we need to be proactive and have our team in place!

    • jmearse says:

      Hi Sandra,

      Just to add to what Beth was saying, where I practice (Nevada), I encourage my clients to bring whomever they would like to their exams, be it mom, sister, best friend, etc. I did a pelvic exam/pap this week with the client’s 5 sisters in the room with her.
      This is a great “test issue” when looking for a good provider, because it really shows where the values of the facility and/or provider are. Having no one else in the room is easier for ME, but if having your entire volleyball team in the room is better for YOU, then it’s an easy call. We do what’s better for the client, every time.

  2. Sandra McGrandle says:

    Thank you so much, Beth. The CNM is a man, right? This is not an issue for me, but I hope that my daughter won’t be “offput” by this (she has always preferred women doctors as a general rule, although her dentist and orthodontist are both male and she’s okay with them). Do you have any suggestions about what to say to try and make this more palatable for her if she is uneasy about trusting what he says since he’s not a woman? I know it might sound odd but I’m just going by past experiences with her feelings.

    • Beth Learn
      Beth Learn says:

      She’s not alone. Most young girls initially feel more comfortable with a female provider, however, I chose a male for some very specific and researched reasons that I share in the guide note on that lesson – mainly that there are still more male than female pediatricians, urologists and gynecologists. Although he is definitely a rarity as a male midwife. It’s highly likely that she will have a male examine her at some point in the future, and she needs to know her rights in that situation AND that it’s possible to have a male provider who is amazing like Jacob. He really sets the standard, and all our reviewers loved him! I was blessed to have a fantastic male OB/GYN deliver my children, and he was more empathetic than ANY female provider I had worked with. Nowadays I have a wonderful female midwife who does my well-woman care.

  3. Pingback: Raising Girls – CLAFF'S

  4. Emily says:

    Wow, this sounds like a great course! I’m sure many of us wish we had had that kind of information growing up. I feel grateful having amazing midwives who will provide well-women care in our home when that time comes.

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